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Pupils' mental health improved through school-based programme, study shows
11 May 2017

School-aged children can be taught to better their mental health through intervention programmes delivered at school, suggests a new study carried out in east London and led by an academic at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?
27 April 2017

Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria.

Seasonal warming leads to smaller animal body sizes
29 March 2017

Changes in the body size of animals measured under controlled laboratory conditions have been shown to closely match changes in body size with seasonal warming in nature, according to research from School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS).

Ghosts of past diseases shape species evolution
21 March 2017

A team of researchers from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG) has revealed that diseases can not only affect fish evolution, but also the aquatic environments in which fish live.

Teaching video - what is teaching excellence?
21 March 2017

Our Teaching Interest Group and Education Research (TIGER) ran a seminar on what is teaching excellence.  Watch the video of the seminar below and see what our three speakers had to say.

New technology enables detailed analysis of target proteins
20 March 2017

A team of researchers from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS), Francis Crick Institute,Goethe University Frankfurt and University of Tübingen in Germany have developed a novel technology to understand how an important protein connects to other cellular proteins.

Blog post: staff v. student football showdown
17 March 2017

Dr Tippu Sheriff blogs about the recent staff versus student football match in the chemistry and biochemistry department, which he and his fellow lecturers are in no way bitter about losing.  

Ball-rolling bees reveal complex learning
10 March 2017

Bumblebees can be trained to score goals using a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities, according to scientists at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Goats can identify the calls of their goat friends
7 March 2017

A new study led by scientists at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL has found that goats can recognise their stablemate friends calling by developing a mental image of how they sound and look.

Queen Mary University of London part of £3m consortium for structural biology
3 March 2017

A new £3m grant from Wellcome Trust to a consortium involving scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) will help to set up a new facility for cryo-electron microscopy – a technology that is revolutionising biology.

Researchers reveal that not all violent acts are equal
12 January 2017

People from different nationalities make similar judgements and decisions about the severity of different violent acts – a finding that could help international organisations, such as the UN and World Health Organisation to better manage crime and violent behaviour – according to research led by the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL.

Teaching blog - helping first years make the leap
5 January 2017

Our Teaching Interest Group and Education Research (TIGER) ran a seminar on helping first year students adjust with guest speaker Dr Harriet Jones from the University of East Anglia.  TIGER founder and chair Dr Rachel O'Callaghan blogs about the seminar.  You can also watch a recording of the event below. 

Ash tree genome aids fight against disease
4 January 2017

Researchers at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have successfully decoded the genetic sequence of the ash tree, to help the fight against the fungal disease, ash dieback. 

Photo µSR gives insights into key industrial processes and fundamental science
3 January 2017

Photochemistry is a chemical reaction caused by the absorption of light (photons). It underpins a large range of important biological and industrial processes, from photosynthesis in plants through a host of chemical engineering applications – for example, the manufacture of the antimalarial drug artemisinin. Excitations in molecules also play a key role in devices – for example organic LEDs and organic photovoltaic cells. 

Researchers create synthetic skin
7 December 2016

Wearable technologies could be transformed with a new type of artificial material that can mimic the properties of skin from sensing touch to even being self-healing.

Competitive males are a blessing and a curse, study reveals
17 November 2016

Showy ornaments used by the male of the species in competition for mates, such as the long tail of a peacock or shaggy mane of a lion, could indicate a species' risk of decline in a changing climate, according to a new study from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.  

Turtle project triumphs in engaging the public
28 October 2016

A conservation project led by Senior Lecturer Dr Christophe Eizaguirre in collaboration with NGOs has been shortlisted for a national award in public engagement, and has won funding from QMUL’s Centre for Public Engagement.

Student coders triumph at London ZooHackathon
21 October 2016

A group of QMUL students were on the winning team of the London ZooHackathon, a computer coding and technology event which aims to tackle wildlife trafficking. Environmental Science student Marysia Clouter, who was part of the winning team, took our third year module Ecology and Conservation, which she says was instrumental in developing her understanding of the natural world.

A Naked Mole-Rat Eutopia at Somerset House
7 October 2016

From 10-16 October, Somerset House’s Utopian Treasury will host a contemporary art installation ‘powered’ by live data from a naked mole-rat colony by Julie Freeman, an artist at Queen Mary University of London.

Scientists discover mechanisms of shape-shifting sea cucumbers
4 October 2016

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences have discovered for the first time how marine animals called sea cucumbers can rapidly change the stiffness of their body, which could provide a useful basis for developing novel biomaterials for applications in medicine.

String pulling bees provide insight into spread of culture
4 October 2016

Bumblebees can learn to pull strings for food and pass on the ability to a colony, according to researchers at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL.

Good food puts bees in good mood
29 September 2016

We all know what it’s like to taste our favourite food and instantly feel good about the world but the same phenomenon may happen in bumblebees.

Big data analysis shows weak link between badgers and cattle for TB transmission
27 September 2016

The largest simulation to date of the numbers of cattle and badgers infected with tuberculosis (TB) casts serious doubts about the extent to which badgers cause TB in cattle, according to research from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL.

Bees remain excellent searchers even when ill
12 September 2016

Honeybees are hardwired to efficiently search the landscape enabling them to continue working for the greater good of their hives even when they are sick, according to new research co-authored by the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL.

Our School celebrates successes in National Student Survey
11 August 2016

Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) continues to rank top in London among Russell Group universities for student satisfaction, according to the latest National Student Survey (NSS).

Teaching blog - large group teaching
9 August 2016

Our Teaching Interest Group and Education Research (TIGER) ran a workshop on large group teaching. TIGER chair Dr Rachel O'Callaghan blogs about the event. You can also watch a recording of the event below.

Our teaching interest group one year in
5 August 2016

Our School formed the Teaching Interest Group and Education Research (TIGER), a forum for anyone involved in teaching and curriculum development, over a year ago. Since then, TIGER has held three events, formed an executive committee, and supported teaching activity in our School and beyond. Dr Rachel O'Callaghan, TIGER founder and chair, shares her thoughts on TIGER's first year.

Could goats become man's best friend?
11 July 2016

Goats have the capacity to communicate with people like other domesticated animals, such as dogs and horses, according to scientists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Lost hormone is found in starfish
5 July 2016

Biologists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) have discovered that the evolutionary history of a hormone responsible for sexual maturity in humans is written in the genes of the humble starfish.

London bee tracking project - save London bees
4 July 2016

Hundreds of bees with individual coloured number tags have been released from our rooftops for a project that hopes to uncover the secret lives of London’s bees. Biologists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences have attached weather-resistant number tags on the backs of bees, and encourage the public to identify them and take photos for a competition.

Schools compete in chemistry festival at SBCS
16 May 2016

School kids from across London, Middlesex, Hertfordshire, Essex and Kent competed in an exciting day of hands-on chemistry at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Teaching awards triumph for SBCS
26 April 2016

It was highly flattering to be nominated for Teacher of the Year in the 2015-16 Queen Mary Student Union (QMSU) Teaching Awards, especially as I’ve always held the belief that I was “just doing my job”. I was absolutely flabbergasted to have won and am extremely grateful to all the students who took the time to nominate me and other staff for the award.

SBCS palaeontologist chronicles tyrannosaur evolution in new book
21 April 2016

How the dinosaur group, the tyrannosaurs, evolved over the course of 100-million years into the giant carnivorous bone-crushers that are so well recognised today, is charted in a new book by a Zoology lecturer from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Student Voices: Dinosaurs in the Horniman Museum
21 April 2016

Our Student Voices series gives our students a chance to blog about life at QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. This edition is written by Patrick Hennessey, third year zoology student, who recently went to the Horniman Museum with staff and students from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Student voices: presenting at a conference
30 March 2016

Our Student Voices series gives our students a chance to blog about life at QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences. This edition is written by Jemma Mary Brett, third year Zoology student, who recently presented at the British Conference of Undergraduate Research (BCUR).

New study reveals new pathway for river pollution
30 March 2016

Scientists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered new ways how rivers convert excess nitrogen, which can have damaging impacts on the environment, to harmless nitrogen in a new study published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

What does geographic profiling have to do with modern art?
3 March 2016

Scientists at the School of Biological and Chemical Science (SBCS) at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have shown research on infectious disease outbreaks can been adapted to study the locations of artworks by graffiti artist Banksy.

Flowers tone down the iridescence of their petals and avoid confusing bees
29 February 2016

Flowers' iridescent petals, which may look plain to human eyes, produce the perfect signal for bees, according to a new study involving researchers from QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Prof Marina Resmini delivers her inaugural lecture
12 February 2016

In February 2016, Professor Marina Resmini delivered her inaugural lecture: Why size matters: from antibodies to nanomaterials.

Starfish reveal the origins of brain messenger molecules
10 February 2016

Biologists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have discovered the genes in starfish that encode neuropeptides - a common type of chemical found in human brains. The revelation gives researchers new insights into how neural function evolved in the animal kingdom.

Slime can see
9 February 2016

After more than 300 years of looking, scientists led by Queen Mary University of London have figured out how bacteria “see” their world. And they do it in a remarkably similar way to us.

Going postgraduate? Find out all you need to know
4 February 2016

Find out more about postgraduate study in Bioinformatics, Ecology, Botany, Chemical Research and more, and discover more about the world-leading research, teaching and support we offer our MSc students.

Student Voices - wading in Windermere
21 January 2016

Postgraduate students on our Aquatic Ecology and Freshwater and Marine Ecology MSc programmes went on a week-long field trip to the Lake District.  Two of our students - Kirsty MacLeod and Adrienne Kerley - have blogged about the trip. Find out what they got up to.

Student voices: life is for living
18 January 2016

Our Student Voices series gives our students a chance to blog about life at QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

First demonstration of sexual selection in dinosaurs identified
14 January 2016

Large ornamental structures in dinosaurs, such as horns and head crests are likely to have been used in sexual displays and to assert social dominance, according to a new analysis of Protoceratops carried out by scientists at the School of Biological and Chemical sciences (SBCS) at QMUL.

Phytoplankton like it hot: Warming boosts biodiversity and photosynthesis in phytoplankton
21 December 2015

Warmer temperatures increase biodiversity and photosynthesis in phytoplankton, researchers at the Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and University of Exeter have found. Globally, phytoplankton - microscopic water-borne plants - absorb as much carbon dioxide as tropical rainforests and so understanding the way they respond to a warming climate is crucial.

Five biomedical scientists visit Nanchang University in China
1 December 2015

After over 10,000 miles and 48 hours of travelling, five biomedical scientists from Queen Mary found their way to Nanchang University, China. The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at QMUL runs a joint undergraduate programme with Nanchang University, and our London-based students went to visit Nanchang as part of a cultural exchange project.

New review on origin and evolution of the nervous system
27 November 2015

A review from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences highlights the importance of developmental processes in understanding nervous system evolution.

Student voices: obsession is a great thing
26 November 2015

Our Student Voices series gives our students a chance to blog about life at QMUL's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Using technology to enhance student outcomes
16 November 2015

Dr James Pickering visited Queen Mary in November to give a talk on using technology to enhance student outcomes, attended by academics across the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, the School of Medicine and Dentistry, the E-Learning unit and beyond.

Male bees have more than a one-track mind
16 November 2015

Male bumblebees are just as smart as female worker bees despite their dim-witted reputation, according to new research from Queen Mary's School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Success at Engagement and Entrepreneurship awards
12 November 2015

Academics from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences triumphed at the recent Public Engagement and Entrepreneurship awards, which recognise outstanding staff and student achievement throughout Queen Mary.

Watching cement dry could help dental fillings last longer
10 November 2015

Scientists led by the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and Aberystwyth University have revealed ‘sweet points’ for dental fillings, where cement used to fill cracks regain elasticity before hardening indefinitely. This could have implications for creating more durable and longer-lasting fillings in the future.

PhD student stumbles upon a new way for producing oldest chemical compounds
28 October 2015

A chemistry PhD student has found a simple way for the first time of producing two chemical compounds that were first discovered in late 19th century, entirely by accident. The discovery could have implications for fighting disease and growing crops, where the sulfur containing compounds called sultones and sultines, play a significant role.

Industry collaboration drives Queen Mary research into higher yields in agricultural crops
28 October 2015

Scientists from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences have teamed up with industry to create the next generation of lighting systems.  Professor Alexander Ruban, Professor of Biophysics, collaborated with Finnish company Valoya and Microsoft to create a novel solution for simulation of natural outdoor light.

Is happiness a matter of our genes?
27 October 2015

Senior lecturer in development psychology at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences Dr Michael Pluess organised a public event at Queen Mary University of London, in partnership with the Centre for Economic Performance from the London School of Economics and Action for Happiness

Students triumph at Biotechnology Entrepreneurs Scheme
21 October 2015

A team of Queen Mary postgraduate students are through to the final of the annual Biotechnology YES (Young Entrepreneur Scheme) competition.

Giraffe, impala and boomslang - our South Africa field trip
6 October 2015

Lecturer Dr Dave Hone shares his experience of our recent field trip to South Africa, open to undergraduate students on our biology, genetics and zoology programmes. 

First imagery from echolocation reveals new signals for hunting bats
14 September 2015

The ability of some bats to spot motionless prey in the dark has baffled experts until now. By creating the first visual images from echolocation, researchers reveal we have been missing how bats sense their world.

Queen Mary scientists speak at Professor Brian Cox's summer school
28 August 2015

Two scientists from Queen Mary’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences spoke at a science summer school event this week with Professor Brian Cox. Mathematical biologist Dr Steve Le Comber and PhD student James Borrell were invited along with other top scientists to deliver talks at the St Paul’s Way Trust Science Summer School 2015.

Freshers week tips from our undergraduates
26 August 2015

Starting your undergraduate degree at Queen Mary soon? Have dozens of questions or concerns? Some of our lovely student ambassadors have shared their experiences. Take a look below to get a taste of what your Freshers Week will be like.

Fallow deer are all about the bass when sizing up rivals
17 August 2015

Research published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology, has found that fallow deer bucks make judgements about the possible threat from competitors from the sound of their calls.

School of Biological and Chemical Sciences celebrates successes in National Student Survey
12 August 2015

Student satisfaction in biology and zoology teaching in QMUL’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences has increased by 5% in a year, according to the latest National Student Survey (NSS). In addition, molecular biology, biophysics and biochemistry teaching was ranked fourth in London.

Find out about our outstanding year in our annual report
21 July 2015

We've released our first ever annual report, looking back at this year's exciting developments at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences.

Study finds pet owners reluctant to face up to their cats' kill count
10 July 2015

Cat owners fail to realise the impact of their cat on wildlife according to new research from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences and the University of Exeter.

Naked mole-rats anti-cancer gene is unique among mammals
6 May 2015

Researchers have found that the gene which gives naked mole-rats their natural resistance to cancer is unique among mammals.

Bumblebees use nicotine to fight off parasites
28 April 2015

Bumblebees that have been infected by parasites seek out flowers with nicotine in the nectar, likely to fight off the infection, new research has found. The nicotine appears to slow the progression of disease in infected bees but has harmful effects when consumed by healthy bees.

Proteins that control anxiety in humans and cause insects to shed their skins have common origin
22 April 2015

Researchers have discovered that a protein which controls anxiety in humans has the same molecular ancestor as one which causes insects to moult when they outgrow their skins. Studies on sea urchins provided the missing link because they have a protein with elements common to those in both humans and insects and reveal a common ancestry hundreds of millions of years ago.

New evidence that tyrannosaurs fought and ate each other
10 April 2015

Examination of a Daspletosaurus skull by Dr David Hone of the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences found signs that it had been bitten by another tyrannosaur during its lifetime as well as after it had died.

Professor Mark Trimmer delivers his Inaugural Lecture
9 April 2015

In April 2015 Professor Mark Trimmer delivered his inaugural lecture - New spokes for old cycles: The life sustaining transformation of bio-elements on Earth

Bumblebees differentiate flower types when arranged horizontally but not vertically
7 April 2015

Bumblebees trained to go to feeders labelled with a certain colour or pattern cue but avoid differently labelled alternative feeders did so when feeders were arranged horizontally but didn’t when arranged vertically. Researchers believe this could be because groups of flowers arranged horizontally, like those in a meadow, often include several different species, while those arranged vertically, like in blossoming trees are likely to all be the same species.

Conscientious children less likely to smoke
24 March 2015

Conscientious children are less likely to smoke in later life, a study carried out by Dr Michael Pluess of QMUL and researchers from UCL has found.

Cold-blooded animals grow bigger in the warm on land, but smaller in warm water
23 March 2015

Scientists studying arthropods, the group of cold-blooded animals that includes crabs and insects, have found that individuals within species living on land tend to grow to a larger size in the warm and nearer the equator, but that the reverse is true of species found in water.

We announce a new educational partnership with Kew
27 February 2015

From September 2015 QMUL will be offering a new MSc Plant and Fungal Taxonomy, Diversity and Conservation in collaboration with the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew.

Bees form false memories just like humans
27 February 2015

In the same way that humans sometimes remember things that didn’t actually occur, researchers have found that bees also misremember. False memories have never been observed in non-human animals before.

'Stressed' young bees could be the cause of colony collapse
9 February 2015

Pressure on young bees to grow up too fast could be a major factor in explaining the disastrous declines in bee populations seen worldwide.

Tropical wasps attack intruders with unfamiliar faces
4 February 2015

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) in collaboration with the University of Florence, have discovered that a species of tropical wasps can memorise the faces of members of their colony and will attack any individual with an unfamiliar face. These wasps can also recognise the smell of their nestmates, but pay more attention to the unique facial patterns in their species when considering whether an individual is friend or foe.

'Nudge' psychology is not based on robust evidence and conscious decision-making is more effective
28 January 2015

A new study says that the kind of instinctive decision-making advocated in best-selling popular psychology books like ‘Nudge’, ‘Thinking Fast and Slow’ and ‘Blink’ is not backed up by reliable evidence.

Life-sized Tyrannosaurus rex skull arrives on campus
16 January 2015

The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) has taken delivery of a life-sized cast of a Tyrannosaurus rex skull that will be used for school visits, public engagement and outreach.

Testing for Bovine Tuberculosis is more effective than badger culls at controlling the disease
14 January 2015

Modelling produced by researchers in QMUL’s School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (SBCS) has found that the only effective potential Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) control strategies are badger culling, cattle testing, controlling cattle movement, and ceasing the practice of housing farm cattle together during winter.

We confirm our place as one of the UK’s elite research departments in the REF 2014
18 December 2014

The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences has shown itself to be one of the UK’s elite research departments in the UK with our latest ranking in the Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Research highlights from our 2014 REF submission
18 December 2014

Academics within the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences are involved in a wide range of ground breaking projects across the broad sweep of biological, chemical and psychological sciences. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 will consider the strength of our research in six core areas.

Do you speak cow? Researchers listen in on ‘conversations’ between calves and their mothers
16 December 2014

Researchers have been eavesdropping on 'conversations' between calves and their mothers — measuring the process of how cows communicate using detailed acoustic analysis for the first time.

Dr Isabelle Mareschal conducts experiments with Science Museum visitors
8 December 2014

Londoners are notorious for avoiding eye contact with each other but how bad are we really? That’s one of the things visitors to the Science Museum can currently help to find out if they take part in an experiment being run by QMUL and UCL researchers to learn how long people can comfortably make eye contact with someone else.

Did Christopher Columbus really bring syphilis back to Europe?
8 December 2014

Following his comments in the Daily Mail, where he questioned new theories derived from a single skeleton with a questionable pathology, Dr Rob Knell was asked to write a piece in the Conversation about his theories on whether Christopher Columbus brought syphilis back to Europe.

Animal welfare could be improved by new understanding of their emotions
5 December 2014

A new study from researchers at Queen Mary University of London looking at how goats express subtle positive emotions could lead to greater understanding of animal welfare.

We welcome the NERC Doctoral Training Partnership students to our School
18 November 2014

This week we are hosting students from the London Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Doctoral Training Partnership to offer our expertise and training for their PhD projects.

Alan McElligott's work with goats is featured in the Guardian newspaper
17 November 2014

Alan McElligott’s research on optimistic goats has been featured in the Guardian’s piece on Do animals have emotions?

QMUL scientists find further evidence that fish are cleverer than previously thought
31 October 2014

Scientists working at Queen Mary University of London and University of Bath have found that zebrafish are able to visually process multiple objects simultaneously, more proof that fish are cleverer than their ‘three-second memory’ reputation suggests.

Students make important dinosaur discovery in Canada
21 October 2014

Final year undergraduate students from the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences studying a new module called Species and their Relationships: Dinosaurs to DNA have uncovered a rare and important dinosaur skull while on a trip to Canada as part of the course.

Entire amphibian communities are being wiped out by emerging viruses
17 October 2014

Scientists from QMUL, UCL, Zoological Society of London, and the National Museum of Natural Sciences (MNCN-CSIC) in Madrid, tracing the real-time impact of viruses in the wild have found that entire amphibian communities are being killed off by closely related viruses introduced to mountainous areas of northern Spain.

Queen Mary receives share of £125m for bioscience PhD students
2 October 2014

Queen Mary University of London is part of a group of London-based institutions awarded £15m to train bioscience PhD students as part of a £125m nationwide campaign to support the training and development of PhD students tackling some of the world’s major challenges.

What will you discover?
29 September 2014

Chemistry students discover new way of identifying hydrogen peroxide
12 September 2014

Chemists from Queen Mary University of London have discovered a new way of identifying peroxide-based explosives, which could make detection of suspect devices more cost-effective in the future.

It's a do or die situation in this clash of the ash
20 August 2014

Dr Richard Buggs has been working with Teagasc researchers, and other partners, to counter ash dieback disease by crossing Asian and Irish species of the tree.

Students give us their seal of approval
13 August 2014

Molecular Biology and Chemistry programmes at Queen Mary University of London are ranked second in London for student satisfaction, according to the latest results of a nationwide poll of final-year undergraduates.

Congratulations to our academic excellence prizewinners!
23 July 2014

The School of Biological and Chemical Sciences awarded prizes to over 30 students for outstanding academic excellence. Most of the prizes were awarded to graduating students but a few were given to first and second year students who have done exceptionally well in their studies so far.

Professor Peter Hudson FRS on biology, baths and identifying your groove
22 July 2014

Professor Peter Hudson FRS was named as an Honorary Doctor of Science (DSc) for his work in disease ecology at the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences Summer graduation ceremony.

Ambika Kumar named Course Rep of the Year
18 July 2014

Ambika Kumar was named Course Rep of the Year at the Education Awards 2014. She is graduating with a First class degree in Biomedicine before going straight on to a PhD in Microbiology at Queen Mary.

Scientists improve metal detectors for early diagnosis of lifestyle and age-related diseases
10 July 2014

Sensors created by chemists at Queen Mary University of London could lead to a set of new tools for researchers to investigate conditions like diabetes resulting in earlier diagnosis and new treatments.

Silver lining found for making new drugs
26 June 2014

Chemists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered a new chemical to aid drug manufacturing processes, making it more environmentally-friendly and easier to scale up for industry.

Chemistry festival for secondary school pupils returns with new science challenges
24 June 2014

Students from schools across London, Hertfordshire and Kent enjoyed an exciting day of hands-on fun activities at the Salters' Festival of Chemistry at Queen Mary University of London on Wednesday 14 May.

Criminal profiling technique targets killer diseases
3 June 2014

A mathematical tool used by the Metropolitan Police and FBI has been adapted by researchers at Queen Mary University of London to help control outbreaks of malaria, and has the potential to target other infectious diseases.

UK top 10 for QMUL in international science and medicine rankings
29 May 2014

A league table measuring the scientific performance of some 750 universities worldwide rates Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) 9th in the UK and 52nd globally.

Hat-trick of research awards for QMUL bee expert
9 May 2014

A scientist from Queen Mary University of London, who studies how bees forage for food and the evolution of their sensory systems, has received a top prize from the UK’s national academy of science as well as a prestigious grant from the international Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP). These two awards are in addition to a major grant awarded by European Research Council last month.

Crayfish study provides complicated web of interactions
17 February 2014

How different species of invasive crayfish interact with each other and affect their local environment has been uncovered for the first time by scientists at Queen Mary University of London.

Farming and wetlands: readdressing the balance
10 February 2014

More than 50 per cent of our planet’s wetlands, from peatbogs to estuaries, both natural and man-made, are under threat from habitat destruction and climate change.

Fight or flight? Vocal cues help deer decide during mating season
10 February 2014

Male fallow deer are sensitive to changes in the groans that rivals make during mating season when competing for the attention of female deer, and can assess the level of threat other males pose simply from vocal cues, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London.

QMUL Research seeks to safeguard the Future of Europe’s Ash Trees
28 November 2013

SBCS's Dr Richard Buggs is the local organiser of the international fraxback conference. On Friday 29th of November, Dr Buggs will host a session entitled “Living with ash dieback in continental Europe: present situation, long-term experience and future perspectives” at the Linnean Society of London.

The One Show: Bees
12 March 2013

Chimpanzee justice
29 November 2012

I woke up gay
19 April 2012

How sex works
17 January 2012

Culture evolves
21 September 2011

See with your ears?
9 August 2011

New bat for Sumatra
12 November 2010

Move over lab rat
31 October 2010

The germ breeders
22 June 2010

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